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Ann Marie T. Sullivan, M.D., Commissioner
Governor Andrew M. Cuomo

Frequently Asked Questions

Many people have questions about mental health, mental illness and New York State’s public mental health system. You will find some of the most frequently asked questions and their answers here, and check back often for additions and updates. If you don't find what you're looking for, contact us.

  1. How do I find a job at the Office of Mental Health?
  1. Please review the employment information available in the employment section of our website. From this page you may view the current job openings for each OMH facility as well as by occupation. Information regarding Civil Service examinations is also available.
  1. Can I get a copy of a birth or death certificate for a family member that was a resident of one of the Office of Mental Health's facilities?
  1. Birth records, death records, and marriage records are considered Vital Records in New York State and generally can be accessed by the public. If you are interested in exploring this option, you can obtain more information on how to obtain these records on the New York State Department of Health's vital Records website at www.nyhealth.gov Leaving OMH site
  1. I have been doing genealogy research and have discovered that one of my relatives was a resident at one of the Office of Mental Health facilities. I would like to find out any personal or medical information about them. Can I obtain a copy of these records?
  1. The Office of Mental Health is dedicated to the maintenance of privacy and confidentiality of patient information. We feel this is especially true with regard to mental health treatment records. It has long been recognized that the very fact of one's mental illness, and receiving professional help for such illness, can, if generally revealed, cause a person to be subjected to prejudice and stigma in one's personal and professional life. We also recognize that effective and lasting psychiatric therapy can take place only in an environment of privacy and trust in which the patient knows that his/her statements will be held in confidence.

    New federal regulations that govern the privacy of individually identifying health information, have underscored this requirement. While it has always been our position that a person's right to confidentiality of clinical information does not change upon his or her death, federal regulations have given us some additional specific guidance on access to records of deceased patients. Therefore, we have recently modified our policy and procedures and require the following before we can provide any information from a deceased patient's clinical record:

    1. Birth records, death records, and marriage records are considered Vital Records in New York State and generally can be accessed by the public. If you are interested in exploring this option, you can obtain more information on how to obtain these records on the New York State Department of Health's vital Records website at www.nyhealth.gov Leaving OMH site
    2. If you are a family member of the deceased patient and the patient allowed our facility to share information with you while he or she was living, and it is reasonable to assume that the patient did not intend to revoke his or her permission to continue to communicate with you prior to his or her death, we may provide you with basic information about the patient's condition and circumstances of his or her death, if appropriate.
    3. If you are a family member of the deceased patient and the information from the patient's record is relevant to your own health care, we can release the information to your physician, provided the physician submits a written request to us on your behalf.
    4. If you are the executor of the deceased patient's estate, or if you otherwise have legal authority to act on behalf of the patient or his/her estate, (e.g. you have letters testamentary issued by a court), we can release information to you upon your written request which documents and attests to your legal authority to act on behalf of the deceased patient. We can also release information to you if you obtain and provide us with the written consent from the executor or legal representative of the deceased patient.
    5. In all of these cases, we are required to review the record prior to its release to ensure it does not infringe upon the privacy rights of any other individual who may be named in the record.

    The only exception would be if you believe a patient was buried in one of our cemeteries. If so, then with appropriate family linkage documentation, including birth and death certificates, we could provide you with information on the individual's burial site. Requests should be sent to John Allen, Consumer Affairs, NYS Office of Mental Health, 44 Holland Avenue, Albany, NY 12229.